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Slovenia and the Western Balkans

Cooperation, help and development for the Western Balkans regions is one of the central priorities of Slovenia’s foreign policy. The ultimate objective of Slovenia’s activities in the region is to create a favourable environment in the Western Balkans (WB) for Slovenia to pursue its national interests, where the security, stability and development of that region are considered essential, particularly in economic terms.

 

Political Cooperation with the Western Balkans Countries

 

Slovenia takes part in several regional organisations and integrations promoting the inclusion of all countries, including Kosovo. Slovenia also offers strong and continuous political support for the WB countries in the process of their accession to the EU and Nato. Support for EU enlargement is expressed in the framework of the EU Council structures as well as in bilateral contacts with the Member States, as it is vital for the continuation and implementation of the reform processes in the region.

Slovenia also supports the political processes and activities of international organisations (Council of Europe, OSCE, UN) with the aim of promoting stability and progress of the reform processes in the region. 


 
Economic Cooperation with the Western Balkans Countries

The Western Balkans is the second most important market for Slovenia in terms of bilateral trade volume: in 2013, these markets accounted for 14% of Slovenia’s exports (same as in 2012), and 8.6% of Slovenia’s total imports (7.9% in 2012).

The most important markets are Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Macedonia, Montenegro, Kosovo and Albania.
 
In 2013, the total trade volume increased by almost five per cent in comparison to the previous year.

 
Areas of Action


The areas of Slovenia’s activity in the Western Balkans are numerous; we can emphasise international development assistance, finance, defence, agriculture, education, internal affairs and tourism.

Trade with countries of Western Balkans in 2013 (source: Report 2014)